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Posts tagged "Asbestos-Related Deaths"

Case of alleged unsafe asbestos removal at high school settled

An asbestos abatement company has lost its license after being sued by the Attorney General's Office last year. The company was contracted to perform a $65 million renovation project at a Massachusetts high school and is accused of illegally conducting demolition and renovation. Unable to pay the civil penalties it incurred, the company forfeited its license to perform asbestos abatement work. Also named in the lawsuit for failure to adequately supervise the work was a construction company and two subcontractors that were hired to monitor the asbestos removal.

OSHA workplace asbestos regulations

For years, in North Carolina and throughout the country, asbestos was used in many products, such as tiles, insulation, automotive parts and consumer products. It is now widely known that regular asbestos exposure may result in a fatal asbestos-related disease, like mesothelioma. Therefore, asbestos use is highly regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Off-roading may lead to asbestos exposure

According to a recent study, North Carolinians, like the rest of the country, using off-road vehicles (ORVs), such as all-terrain vehicles, four-wheel-drive vehicles and off-road motorcycles, may be exposed to naturally occurring asbestos fibers. When driving these ORVs, dust is often kicked-up which can put drivers at risk of asbestos exposure.

Firefighters face high risk of asbestos exposure

North Carolina firefighters face hazards, including smoke, fire and explosions. They may also be exposed to asbestos, which causes fatal diseases, such as mesothelioma and asbestosis. Asbestos fibers are most dangerous when disturbed and released into the air that often occurs when buildings are burning and firefighters are inside attempting to put out the fire. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, firefighters have double the rate of malignant mesothelioma, a fatal asbestos-related disease, than the general population.

Securing compensation for foreign claimants

North Carolinian military members may serve abroad, and American employers may have employees working in other countries. But, American-made products are found throughout the world. As such, asbestos exposure does not need to happen in the U.S. for an American citizen to pursue asbestos litigation. In addition, foreign claimants have standing -- just like U.S. citizens -- to bring civil lawsuits in U.S. courts.

The benefits of asbestos trust disclosure reforms

In the past few years, there has been a detrimental trend in North Carolina asbestos litigation, according to the director of the Progressive Policy Institute's Center for Civil Justice (CCJ). The trend involves plaintiffs' lawyers hiding pertinent facts. The CCJ director suggests that the implementation of transparency laws, such as the ones recently introduced in 12 other states, would be beneficial for current and future plaintiffs.

$480 million North Carolina asbestos trust fund case

Recently, a North Carolina federal judge decided whether Safety National Casualty, Corp., must pay $480 million to the mesothelioma fund. The fund was established in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy plan for Garlock Sealing Technologies, Inc., after Garlock declared bankruptcy in 2010, following years of asbestos litigation. Safety National claims that Garlock is not covered under the $5 million excess policy that Safety National issued to Garlock over 30-years ago.

State asbestos hazard management

The North Carolina Asbestos Hazard Management Program (AHMP) provides information to the public about the dangers of asbestos and how to control or eliminate exposure. The program is administered by the Health Hazards Control Unit (HHCU), which consists of industrial hygiene professionals who also accredit individuals that perform asbestos management. All individuals performing asbestos management in North Carolina must be accredited by the AHMP and any plans to demolish a building must be reported to the HHCU.

Governor vetoes "garbage juice" spray bill

North Carolina governor, Roy Cooper, recently vetoed legislation that would allow landfills to dispose the liquid that leaks from trash by spraying it into the air in a currently untested process called leachate aerosolization. The process was accepted in other states, but Cooper was hesitant to endorse a measure that may pose a safety hazard to people and the environment. Critics of the bill call the spray, "garbage juice," and question whether mold, viruses and asbestos could travel once released into the air.

Asbestos exposure claims for navy veterans

Military veterans comprise about 30 percent of all mesothelioma victims. The majority of those exposed to asbestos in the military are U.S. Navy personnel. Although the Navy surgeon general issued a report in 1939 explaining the hazards of asbestos, North Carolina residents may be surprised to hear that the Navy shipbuilding industry continued to use asbestos for at least another 40 years.

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