Asbestos Exposure in Merchant Marines

Merchant mariners or retired merchant mariners who have served in the United States Merchant Marine do not have veteran status despite ongoing efforts to get that designation approved. Nonetheless, the U.S. Merchant Marine has played a key role in military operations as well as civilian endeavors. It consists of a fleet of civilian-owned American merchant vessels. Some are operated by the government; others are private operations.

Merchant Marines and Mesothelioma Claims — Jones Act

Merchant marines have been susceptible to asbestos-related diseases for many of the same reasons that longshoremen, Navy veterans and shipyard workers have often been affected. Namely, the ships and equipment that they work in and around contain numerous products made with or contaminated by asbestos. Pipes, decks, insulation, gaskets and heating systems on ships are a few of the best-known sources of asbestos that merchant mariners have been in contact with.

A merchant mariner who has become ill with mesothelioma as a result of asbestos exposure in the profession may recover compensation through processes and sources spelled out in the Jones Act. The official name of the Jones Act is the Merchant Marine Act of 1920. It allows injured sailors to make claims and collect compensation from employers when injury has been a result of negligence by a ship's owner or crew members.

Contact Mesothelioma Lawyers — The Law Offices of Wallace & Graham

Asbestos exposure in merchant marines is one of many occupational triggers of mesothelioma that our law firm is well familiar with. Our lawyers are prepared to evaluate your case if you were a merchant marine and have been diagnosed with mesothelioma.

Based in North Carolina, we represent clients nationwide. Call 888-698-9975 or contact us online for a free case evaluation. Our skilled and caring asbestos attorneys will explain your rights and fight for you.